News

Headlines

Engaging Non-Traditional Students Through Project-Based Learning

EdisonLearning Session at National Dropout Prevention Conference

As educators, we have all come to understand the benefits of virtual learning; how it can increase student engagement and better match a student’s learning style and needs.

Yet, knowing how to solve problems, work collaboratively, and think innovatively are becoming essential real-world skills for today’s students.

In our session at the National Dropout Prevention Conference, on Monday, October 3, at 3:15 to 4:30 pm; we will outline how teaching and learning strategies, enhanced by interactive Project-Based Curriculum, are transforming the non-traditional learner experience.

Attendees will also have the opportunity to create their own mini-mastery project to better comprehend the non-traditional student’s attainment of critical thinking and analytical skills that lead to sustained success.

During the session, we will utilize the project-based curriculum developed by EdisonLearning, Global Learning Models, and the Capital Area Immediate Unit’s online program - CAOLA.

Engaging Non-Traditional Students Through Project-Based Learning will provide education administrators with essential solutions to meet the needs of students at-risk, and all student populations. Therefore, we hope to see you on Monday.

presenters:

Natalie Williams, EdisonLearning

Eric Davis, Global Learning Models

Holly Brzycki, Capital Area Intermediate Unit

READ MORE
Headlines

EdisonLearning Advances “Don’t Let Them Drop” Campaign at the National Dropout Prevention Conference

National Dropout Prevention Center Conference Oct. 2 - 5, 2016

Beginning this upcoming weekend, EdisonLearning will be raising awareness among the nation’s foremost education leaders in the area of dropout prevention and recovery at the National Dropout Prevention Center’s annual conference in Detroit.  Thom Jackson, who serves on the Center’s Board of Directors, will be joined by members of EdisonLearning’s Achievement and Business Development teams to discuss with public school administrators our successful Bridgescape Learning Academies, and the innovative new project-based curriculum that has enhanced our Alternative Education solution.

EdisonLearning’s booth at the conference, which runs from October 1-5, will include the “Don’t Let Them Drop” 3D art installation that visually highlights the sense of urgency on the personal and societal costs of the national drop out crisis, and also depicts that during this current school year – approximately 800,000 young people will drop out of high school – an average of 4,000 every school day – ONE every 90 seconds.

In addition, Natalie Williams of EdisonLearning will be joined by Eric Davis of Global Learning Models, and Holly Brzycki the Capital Area Intermediate Unit in a conference session on October 3, entitled: “Engaging Non-Traditional Students Through Project-Based Learning.”  This session will provide attendees with information about a dynamic and interactive project-based curriculum to transform the non-traditional learner experience, which has been developed by EdisonLearning, Global Learning Models, and the CAIU’s online program - CAOLA. Attendees will also create a mini-mastery project to better comprehend the non-traditional student’s attainment of critical thinking and analytical skills that lead to sustained success.

READ MORE
Headlines

Bridgescape Learning Academy Opens September 20 to Help Dayton Students Earn Their High School Diploma

New Ohio-based Bridgescape Expands Program to More Students

Dayton, OH -- With the number one predictor of success in life being a high school diploma, the leading alternative learning program for students who are at risk of leaving school or have already left school, opens to young people in Dayton on Tuesday, September 20.

The Bridgescape Learning Academy of Dayton, located at 3237 W. Siebenthaler Avenue, will provide an effective and personalized educational option for those students who want to earn a standard high school diploma.

During the recently concluded school year, more than 2,000 high school dropouts and at risk students attended Bridgescape Learning Academies in Chicago, Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Norfolk, Durham, and Bridgeton, NJ.

Understanding that personal issues and challenges may have interfered with a student’s academic progress, Bridgescape offers a flexible program so students can attend on-site classes in the morning, afternoon or evening to suit their needs.

Unlike a traditional school setting, the Bridgescape program is a blend of one-on-one and group instruction, infused with interactive online offerings specifically tailored for each individual student.  Each Academy is staffed with on-site education teams to assist students in their daily studies. Two-thirds of the student’s instruction is provided by EdisonLearning’s eCourses and eSchoolware.

Since its inception in 2010, Bridgescape has awarded diplomas to 2,000 at-risk and dropped-out high school students, and helped prepare them to enter college or receive the necessary credentials to get a job upon graduation.

Eighty-two percent (82%) of students, who enroll in Bridgescape, complete the program and earn their diploma - which is higher than the national graduation rate for all schools.

Dayton-area students interested in learning more about Bridgescape should visit the website at: www.bridgescape.com; or call an enrollment counselor directly at 937-639-3192.

READ MORE
Headlines

New Columbus Bridgescape Location

Bridgescape Learning Academy - Columbus

Columbus, OH -- The Road to Success / Bridgescape Learning Academy received its new signage yesterday.  The school is now located at 3377 Cleveland Avenue in Columbus, to provide an effective and personalized educational option for those students who want to earn a standard high school diploma.  The other Bridgescape Learning Academy in Columbus – Capital High School – is still located at 640 Harrisburg Pike.

With the number one predictor of success in life being a high school diploma, the leading alternative learning program for students who are at risk of leaving school or have already left school, is relocating one of its two area locations to better serve the young people of Columbus.

READ MORE
Headlines

'Kids don't hate math; they hate being frustrated'

Helping Students Succeed at Math

Entering high school math can bring up anxiety for both the student and the parent. Algebra, geometry, trigonometry — the course titles are the same, but believe it or not, the way these classes are now taught in school can look a lot different from what you might remember. Here are a few ways to prepare yourself — and, more importantly, your student — for a successful school year:

The best way to support your student as he transitions to these upper-level math courses is to keep an open dialogue with him about it.

"When Common Core came in, it shifted the focus to include an understanding of everything," said Amy Lee Kinder, who has worked as a math specialist at the Bridgescape Academy in Humboldt Park. "It's more about the process to get there. That's very foreign to how people were taught in the past. It's more about investigative learning and students going through a scenario and understanding a concept completely." 

Kinder said students are now asked, "Why do you think that?" and, "Where does that come from?" They are required to explain how they came to the answer, instead of just spitting out a number.

A great way to prepare your student for the classroom is by asking the same types of questions at home.

"Question, question, question," Kinder said. "Stay involved, as hard as it may be. From the teacher's perspective, it takes a team of people to assist these kids, and support outside the classroom is huge."

If your student is nervous about a new math class, try building up his confidence by revisiting basic concepts, such as addition, subtraction and fractions.

"The issues kids face in algebra aren't necessarily about algebra, but a lack of understanding about what a fraction is — things that precede that higher-level class," said Mark Kriston, owner of two Mathnasium learning centers in Chicago.

It's always good to know when to ask for help. And with more difficult courses that build upon previous concepts, it's probably best for your student to get help sooner, rather than later, if he needs it.

"We don't get calls for tutoring until October or November," Reber said. "That's usually when they've had their first hard test."

But Kinder, who also works as a private math tutor, cautioned: "Once a kid gets behind, it's way harder for them to get caught up." She suggests going over the syllabus with your child as soon as school starts. She said students should be presented with a calendar of what's going to be expected of the class; some teachers will post this information online.

"The more proactive parents can be about getting involved, the better," she said.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/parenting/sc-back-to-school-math-family-0830-20160824-story.html

READ MORE